Last edited by Akijind
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

6 edition of God at work in Israel found in the catalog.

God at work in Israel

Gerhard von Rad

God at work in Israel

by Gerhard von Rad

  • 246 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Abingdon in Nashville .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bible. O.T. -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGerhard von Rad ; translated by John H. Marks.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBS1192 .R3213
    The Physical Object
    Pagination223 p. ;
    Number of Pages223
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4421861M
    ISBN 100687149606
    LC Control Number79026281
    OCLC/WorldCa5677132

      Her story is told in the Book of Judges, Chapters 4 and 5. According to author Joseph Telushkin in his book Jewish Literacy, the only thing known about Deborah's private life was the name of her husband, Lapidot (or Lappidoth). There is no indication who Deborah's parents were, what kind of work Lapidot did, or whether they had any children. Samuel is portrayed as a judge who leads the military, as the judges in the Book of Judges, and also who exercises judicial functions. In 1 Sam –17, a speech of Samuel that portrays him as the judge sent by God to save Israel may have been composed by the Deuteronomists. In 1 Samuel –20, Samuel is seen as a local "seer".

    The Book of Joshua (Hebrew: ספר יהושע ‎ Sefer Yehoshua) is the sixth book in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, and is the first book of the Deuteronomistic history, the story of Israel from the conquest of Canaan to the Babylonian exile.: 42 It tells of the campaigns of the Israelites in central, southern and northern Canaan, the destruction of their enemies, and the. The books of Ezra, Esther, and Nehemiah cover the historical period of Israel's captivity in Babylon and the period immediately following their return to Jerusalem. Israel's return to Jerusalem from Babylon involved about fifty thousand Jews -- much, much fewer than the more recent return, which is such a wonder of our own day. The biblical record accords.

    The Work of God in the Darkest of Times According to , the story took place during the time of the judges. This was a year period after Israel entered the promised land under Joshua and before there were any kings in Israel (roughly BC to BC). GOD TV is available throughout America on DIRECTV, the world’s largest satellite television provider. You can watch us 24 hours a day, days a year on channel of DIRECTV. To become a DIRECTV customer contact or log on to


Share this book
You might also like
Enterprise project governance

Enterprise project governance

Early and medieval coins and currency system of Orissa, circa 300 B.C. to 1568 A.D.

Early and medieval coins and currency system of Orissa, circa 300 B.C. to 1568 A.D.

crisis of qualified manpower for criminal justice

crisis of qualified manpower for criminal justice

Outdoors U.S.A.

Outdoors U.S.A.

Into the whirlwind

Into the whirlwind

Clinical auscultation of the heart

Clinical auscultation of the heart

Show-jumping summer

Show-jumping summer

Lovey Childs: a Philadelphians story

Lovey Childs: a Philadelphians story

Indian crisis

Indian crisis

The death of the animal

The death of the animal

The statutes at large concerning bankrupts

The statutes at large concerning bankrupts

God at work in Israel by Gerhard von Rad Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rad, Gerhard von, God at work in Israel. Nashville: Abingdon, © God at work in Israel Paperback – January 1, by Gerhard von Rad (Author) › Visit Amazon's Gerhard von Rad Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. Gerhard Cited by: 5. While God chose to work with the ancient nation of Israel, this decision did not exclude people of other nations (gentiles) from coming to understand God and serve Him.

God instructed the ancient Israelites that they were to respect peoples of other nationalities who came to live among God’s chosen people. In the book of Exodus, God is the essential worker. The nature and intent of that divine work set the agenda for Moses’ work and through him, the work of God’s people.

God’s initial call to Moses included an explanation of God’s work. This drove Moses to speak in the name of the Lord to Pharaoh saying, “Let my people go” (Exod. By the book’s end, they have finished the work of building the tabernacle according to the Lord's instructions (Exod.

God did not deliver Israel from work. He set Israel free for work. God released them from oppressive work under the ungodly king of Egypt and led them to a new kind of work under his gracious and holy kingship. This republication of a classic work contains a new introduction by Walter Brueggemann that places Gerhard von Rad's work within the context of German theology, Old Testament theology, and the history of interpretation of the Old Testament.

In Old Testament Theology, von Rad applies the most advanced results of form criticism to develop a new understanding of the Bible.3/5(1).

The books of Samuel and Kings narrate deadly battles over royal power in Israel and Judah and claim (not always successfully) that the security of the kingdoms and their leaders depends on the kings’ obedience to God’s will (1Sam1Kgs ). The major action of the book of Joshua is Israel’s conquest of the land God had promised their ancestors (Joshuafollowing ).

The land is the central stage upon which God’s drama with Israel is played out, and it rests at the core of God’s promises to the nation. The Law of Moses itself is inextricably bound to the land.

Other predictions, which speak of a “restoration” of Israel, refer to a spiritual restoration (to God, not Palestine—cf. Isa. ) through Jehovah’s servant, Christ. Sometimes this spiritual restoration to God, through the redemptive work of Christ, is symbolically viewed in terms of the rebuilding of Jerusalem, etc.

(cf. Jer. Moreover, in Isaiah’s view, the way we work today has value and meaning in the New Creation that God promises for his people.

God's Assessment of Israel and Judah (Isaiah) The bulk of the book of Isaiah consists of the prophet Isaiah giving voice to God’s assessment of Israel’s failure to live up to the covenant between God and Israel. ) During this time God sent several prophets to Israel and Judah.

Hosea ( B.C.) prophesied mainly to Israel, the northern ten tribes. Micah ( B.C.) together with Isaiah spoke primarily to Judah in the south. ISAIAH, THE BOOK Two major themes run throughout the book.

There is the exhortation to "Trust in the Holy One of Israel. Samuel and Kings' purpose was to trace the consequences of sin as opposed to the benefits of obedience.

The author of Chronicles, however, chose to write a history of God's work in Israel that spoke to the needs of his postexilic (post-Exile) audience. Ruth was a pagan from Moab, so when she stated what we see in the ve she received the God of Israel as her own.

She converted to the God of Israel, and when the blessings that she received when she accepted the God of Israel as her own, shows us how important it is for our Lord when we accept Him in our lives.

It is a big deal. When Israel turned to Egypt for help, God said Israel was guilty of. The authors of the textbook suggest that the book of Joel was written. B.C. which was not one of the benefits Joel prophesied for Judah. emotional. Israel would be yoked to work in good fields.

THE BOOK OF JOSHUA. The Book of Joshua marks the fulfillment of the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, for God fulfills his promises to Joshua, the successor to Moses, by leading them to the Promised Land.

With God's help, the tribes of Israel united as a single people conquer the land of Canaan, and God through Moses and Joshua assigned each tribe their separate territories. The Book of Samuel forms part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.

Throughout the book of Genesis, the God of Israel is consistently called by the same name. True. Jacob receives a blessing from Isaac because he is the oldest son. False. The genealogy of Israel can be traced all the way back to Abel in the book of Genesis. False. The book opens with a vision of YHWH (יהוה ‎).

The book moves on to anticipate the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, explains this as God's punishment, and closes with the promise of a new beginning and a new Temple. Inaugural vision Ezekiel – God approaches Ezekiel as the divine warrior, riding in his battle chariot is drawn by four living creatures, each.

The tone of the work abruptly changes, however, in chapter 3, as Job begins his poetic speeches by cursing the day on which he was born.

This central section consists of the “comforting” words of his friends, who try to persuade Job that if he is suffering he must have sinned, and Job’s increasingly bitter retorts that he is innocent, and that his punishment is undeserved.

Ezekiel also devotes a great deal of attention to what the restored Israel’s land and temple will look like (Eze 40–48). Ezekiel is the watchman, and through him we see some of God’s generous plans for Israel that have yet to come about.

Quick outline of Ezekiel. God commissions Ezekiel (Eze 1–3) Judgments on Israel (Eze 4–24). Three crises struck in the 8th Century: an alliance of Syria and Israel in B.C.; the fall of Samaria to Assyria in ; and the invasion of Sennacherib of Assyia in B.C.

Hosea and Amos were prophets in Isreal in the North, Isaiah to Judah in the South, Micah at work in both kingdoms; and Jonah met his whale during these times.The purpose of this book is not strictly historical but theological and pastoral.

The main emphasis is that God is at work and all His good deeds, including the construction of the Second Temple, are accomplished "not by might nor by power, but by My Spirit."(Zechariah ) Ultimately, YHWH plans to live again with His people in Jerusalem.

He. God makes this covenant through Jesus Christ in the New Testament—the book of Hebrews explores this new covenant in detail. When the prophet Daniel reads the book of Jeremiah (Dan 9), he prays to the Lord on behalf of Israel—and nicely sums up how the book .